Android Headliner: Where is the OUYA Headed? [Open for Discussion]

July 10, 2013 - Written By Briley Kenney

I’m going to start this editorial with a little disclaimer of sorts. The OUYA is first and foremost a video game console, because of that fact I’m not going to bother tackling the media sharing and playback features of the platform. If you’d like to discuss such features in the comments below you are more than welcome. While the console may be lacking in comprehensive media streaming support currently, I think that minor issue will be sorted out in due time.

Moving on.

Reviews of the OUYA have finally hit the airwaves and the consensus is similar across the board. Of course, you always have exceptions that throw the patterns out of whack, but those are warranted. Every content writer is entitled to a separate opinion, and that’s how reviews work. This allows users, players, consumers [or whatever] to migrate to the review sources they agree with most.

I’m keeping my general opinions on the OUYA to myself. While I understand that the console is revolutionary in the sense that it’s going to change gaming (and not necessarily because of the games), I really think it’s up to everyone else to form their own opinions of the console. It’s certainly different, and that’s the point.

Whether you love it, or hate it -or even feel indifferent about it- that’s entirely up to you.

The real discussion lies in the future of the console, as in where OUYA is headed over the coming years. As it stands, the console is almost entirely indie in terms of content. Sure, there are offerings like Final Fantasy III, and Shadowgun (which borders mainstream even for an Android title), but most of the games on the console are definitely from humble beginnings. TowerFall, for example, a title almost no one had heard of before OUYA was on the market, is now at spot number one for sales on the OUYA marketplace.


It’s also a great source of retro titles, thanks to support from emulators which allow console owners to play games from old game systems like the Gameboy, NES and Sega.

What’s really in store for the console though?

Recently I talked about what Google needs to do in order to produce a successful Android console. My number one point was that they need to bring AAA content to the table. Not in the sense that we should see the next Call of Duty or Halo title on a low-power Android console, but just something from a big-name developer that follows mainstream offerings.

It’s strange that I would propose something like that for a decidedly indie console, but it would definitely bring in more customers.


The question still remains though, where will the console go and where will the content offered on the OUYA marketplace go?

I’d really like to open this discussion up to the rest of the community. Where do you think the OUYA is headed? What kind of games, media and other content do you predict we’ll see? Do you think we’ll ever see AAA quality content for it?