Google Glass

Google Glass Will Be Compatible With iPhone, Android Without a Doubt

February 22, 2013 - Written By Briley Kenney

It seems rather strange that some of the biggest news of the day involving Google’s Project Glass has to do with our iOS brethren. That’s exactly what we’re here to discuss right now.

Was there ever truly any question as to whether or not the platform would be compatible with Android? I don’t honestly think so, but still I’m sure a few folks will be happy to know that is indeed the case.

The real story here is that Google Glass will also be compatible with iOS, or more specifically Apple’s iPhone. How do we know? Apparently the Verge’s Joshua Topolsky got some personal hands-on time with Project Glass. Naturally, he drew up a powerful report that explores the ins and outs of the unusual device. This is one of those rare occasions where I can genuinely suggest that you head over there and see Topolsky’s story. Needless to say, it’s one extremely elegant piece of journalism.

Initially, Glass will not be equipped with its own cellular radio, but it’s possible Google may issue an additional 3G or 4G enabled model at a later time, just like with mobile devices and tablets. It can, however, tether with an Android or iPhone via an active Bluetooth connection and use the phone’s cellular data. This is certainly appealing for when you’re out and about because you kind of need internet these days to get things done. Of course, Glass is also equipped with integrated Wi-Fi support so you can connect directly to different wireless networks when they’re around.

Considering the news that Glass will be compatible with iPhone, in addition to Android, it only makes sense that an app will be coming right along with it. Likely, this is where consumers will be able to get third party apps for use with Glass. The future of the device, at least when it comes to apps and third party software, is relatively obscure.

There are quite a few reports floating around that suggest Google is looking to sell Glass to consumers for less than $1,500. That means, we should all expect the price to be somewhere close to that. I don’t know about you, but I’m genuinely hoping that price eventually drops over time.

Before the commercial release, which is expected later this year, Google will send out some developer units to get the ball rolling. Early signups for the device were offered at Google’s I/O developer conference last year. These early release devices, rightly called the “explorer” edition, will probably be available sometime soon. Google’s next I/O conference is set for May 15, which is probably right around when we’ll see the first release.

As always, stay tuned and we’ll share additional information as soon as it’s available.

Included below is the demo of Google Glass, which shows off what it’s like to wear the device in the wild.