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Say Screw You to AT&T and Verizon with FreedomPop’s Free Wireless Subscription Service

January 9, 2013 - Written By Briley Kenney

I’m sure you’ll be just as surprised as me to know that you can now get wireless internet, wireless phone calling and SMS messaging options totally free. No, this is not some piece of an elaborate hoax, nor is it any kind of scam.

FreedomPop, an internet service that already offers customers free wireless internet, just announced a partnership with TextPlus yesterday. Through the partnership, FreedomPop will now be able to provide free voice calls and text messaging support to wireless subscribers.

FreedomPop CEO Steve Stokols told VentureBeat that customers can “cut the carrier and basically screw AT&T and Verizon.”

Before I address the service and how it works, it would probably be a good idea to explain how FreedomPop is able to do all this. FreedomPop does offer a rich selection of complimentary options sure, but they still have premium services. They make money directly from the sale of their premium services, which are typically added by consumers that desire more freedom. FreedomPop estimates that nearly 30 percent of its user base eventually purchases a service upgrade.

FreedomPop offers users up to 500MB of data each month, with the option to purchase additional data increments at $10-$20 per gigabyte. Users will also be able to trade surplus data to each other over an exclusive social network. So, if you have family members using the service that don’t make use of all their data, they can trade it to you later on.

Stokol says that the company is averaging “about 10-11 invites per user.” So it’s pretty clear that their primary marketing strategy relies on viral metrics.

Later this quarter, the exclusive partnership with TextPlus will kick into gear and FreedomPop subscribers will be able to take advantage of the free voice calls and text messaging options. Ultimately, this will allow wireless customers to operate free of any financial obligations and burdens. While this indubitably seems too good to be true, I can assure you that it’s anything but a falsification.

Voice calls and text messages will make use of the services data channels, thanks to the Android and iOS app. When signing up for the service, customers choose an available number (that uses any wireless area code), or they can transfer their existing number over to the service. Probably the best news is that you don’t need a new SIM card to use your phone with FreedomPop, you can use the one you already have.

Of course, FreedomPop doesn’t offer coverage everywhere, but they’re rapidly expanding support. If you’d like to know about coverage in your area, you can pay a visit to the FreedomPop website and enter your address details. Even if, they don’t show coverage at your home address, it’s possible they have coverage somewhere nearby.

Stokol claims that FreedomPop currently offers coverage “in the top 80 markets.” He elaborated by further stating, “that’s 120 million people.”

“By the third quarter, we’ll have coverage for 240 million people.”

Those numbers are nothing short of impressive. Any service that offers free wireless internet is certainly a blessing in the modern world, especially considering everything is making its way to the cloud. If anything, this is an fantastic opportunity for those with 3G and 4G enabled devices, like tablets, that would like to take advantage of a mobile wireless service without the involvement of radical costs.

In addition, FreedomPop is using Clearwire’s WiMAX network to provide 4G support to its subscribers. That means you can benefit from 4G speeds even for free. I’ve come to accept the fact that free services often require you to make sacrifices, such as no support for 4G, but with FreedomPop it would seem that’s not the case at all.

Surely it won’t be long before the rest of us see the light and say “screw you” to Verizon and AT&T. I’m certainly considering it right now. What do the rest of you think? Is this a plausible option for anyone else out there too?

Source: VentureBeat Mobile