Battery-Meter

3G Nexus 4 Experiencing Worse Battery Life Than iPhone 5; Other LTE Handsets

November 6, 2012 - Written By Tom Dawson

Many of us have felt let down by Google and their decision to leave LTE out of the Nexus 4, personally I think that the decision to leave out LTE was less Google’s and more the industry’s – to keep their software path their own they couldn’t go with LTE as firmware updates would be marred by the carriers. However, that’s another rant for another day and one you’ve more than likely heard before. What you might not have heard however, is that the LG Nexus 4 isn’t faring as well as we’d like it to in the battery life department.

AnandTech have gotten their hands on a Nexus 4 to test and as usual, the fine folks over there have put the phone through its paces. The most interesting part of their tests however seems to be the battery life test, in which AnandTech put the Nexus 4 against the iPhone 5 as well as other LTE packing Android flag bearers such as AT&T’s One X. In a test based solely around web-browsing over cellular, the Nexus 4 managed just 4.18 hours while the iPhone 5 with LTE managed a healthy 8.19 hours and the AT&T One X managing 6.95 hours. This is certainly a little worrying for a device that seemed to pack a sizable battery for a quad-core phone at 2100 mAh, for comparison my One X, being the Internation version packs the power-hungry Tegra 3 in it with just 1800 mAh and I get better battery life than that.

Things might have fared better when it comes to WiFi, no? Nope. The LG Nexus 4 managed only 6.27 hours over WiFi, the iPhone 5 ranked 10.27 hours and the One X again beat the Nexus 4 with 9.93 hours on the clock.

You could ask what does web-browsing have to do with it? Well, this is something that a lot of us do most of on our smartphones and we’d naturally want to know that we’re not going to be on a constant hunt for an outlet. This certainly doesn’t surprise me however as recently, with the 4.0 release series of Android, battery life has taken a hit with each revision and I imagine that Google is working on the problem as we speak. Battery life is something a little hard to test and with evidence like this, Google can see that there is a very real problem and will want to fix it as soon as possible. Would bad battery life be a deal-breaker for you?

[Source: AnandTech via PhoneArena]