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Featured: Intel Says “No” to Porting Android for Clover Trail Tablets

July 23, 2012 - Written By Christina Gardner

Intel is working on releasing their new atom chip, which is code-named “Clover Trail.” It’s being built-in light for Microsoft’s Windows 8 according to an un-named source that is close to the company and its plans.

Any tablets being released will coincide with the release of Windows 8, which is expected later this year around fall. Intel has about 20 different Clover Trail tablet designs in the works currently. One of the company manufacturers making the tablets will be Acer.

Intel and Clover Trail have been working very closely with Microsoft with ideas and suggestions regarding tablets that will consist of Windows 8 and a touch interface.  There have been “sightings” of Clover Trail tablets running Windows 8, but so far none with Android. There have been “sightings” of a tablet containing a different atom chip called the “medfield” showing off an Android OS. Vizio is one of the rumored manufacturers to be producing this type of tablet that will consist of a 10-inch screen.

A source in an article stated that Microsoft Windows 8 could be seen as a “big” threat to Google and its Android OS. Many manufacturers are putting full backing into Microsoft Windows 8 for their tablets. An example would be Dell, who solely supports Microsoft Windows 8.

As for mobile devices, Intel is keeping its options open, but tablets it would seem, Windows 8 is the main OS above Android. I can’t say for sure how this will make the Android Community feel regarding this news, as Microsoft Windows 8 has many mixed reviews. There have been no actual statements released regarding this. However, in earlier June PCWorld put out an article saying Intel felt processors were being wasted on the Android OS (Dual Core Processors Wasted on Android, Intel Claims).

I’m sure more News on this issue will be covered, but for now, Microsoft Windows 8 seems to be the winner with Intel, at least in the tablet aspect.

 

Sources: PCWorld